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The aftermath of the El Paso shooting

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The Clarion Project

Understanding El Paso



In the aftermath of the El Paso shooting, there has been a fresh outcry against white supremacy. The shooter appears to have posted a manifesto online explaining in detail his motives for the attack and the racist ideology behind it.

Liberals, like Presidential Candidate Beto O’Rourke, who represented El Paso as a congressman, have already used the horrific shooting to accuse President Donald Trump of encouraging the white supremacist ideology by stating their mantra “[Trump] is a racist and stokes racism.”

Other Democratic candidates have made similar comments about the El Paso shootings, saying that Trump’s push to build a wall on the U.S. border with Mexico demonizes immigrants in the eyes of Americans.

Conservatives argue the opposite. They point to the reasons that Trump himself says about why he wants to build a wall: to stop the powerful Mexican drug cartels from using the porous border to push their poison and human trafficking into America. Today, virtually anyone trying to cross the border for whatever reasons must pay off and be “accepted” by the cartels or risk being murder by them.

Conservatives point to larger vision of Trump’s immigration policy – protecting the unskilled American labor force – which consists heavily of blacks and Hispanics – from undue competition from foreign unskilled laborers.

This policy, in connection with bringing manufacturing jobs back from Asia, has resulted in the lowest unemployment rate for blacks in American in decades (currently at 6 percent).

Yet why do we see that, of late, white supremacists seem to be coming out of the woodwork. Were they always there? And if so, why are they emerging now?

Understanding this phenomena will help America in the fight against this toxic ideology.

Read more: https://clarionproject.org/understanding-el-paso/