Homeland Security Network Blog

The information source for first responders.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Archives
    Archives Contains a list of blog posts that were created previously.
Posted by on in Terrorism
  • Font size: Larger Smaller
  • Hits: 330
  • Print

Update: More US firms believed hit by cyberattack

b2ap3_thumbnail_SF-Gate.jpg

SF Gate

NEW YORK (AP) — The latest on the global extortion cyberattack that hit dozens of countries (all times local):

3:25 p.m.

A law enforcement official says investigators believe additional companies in the United States have been affected by the global "ransomware" software cyberattack but have not yet come forward to report the attacks.

The official spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the official was not authorized to speak publicly about an ongoing investigation.

The official says that investigators have obtained some of the phishing emails and are analyzing them for "bread crumbs" that may lead them to the attackers.

Authorities have been encouraging affected companies to contact law enforcement and not pay the ransom.

While the attack that emerged Friday hitting companies and governments around the world ebbed in intensity Monday, experts warned that new versions of the virus could emerge.

Investigators fear the ransomware can be re-released without a kill switch that allowed researchers to interrupt the malware's initial spread.

___

3 p.m.

President Donald Trump's homeland security adviser says that so far, no U.S. federal systems have been affected by the global cyberattack.

Tom Bossert says the U.S. government has been closely monitoring the attack, which has affected an estimated 300,000 machines in 150 countries. He noted a few U.S. businesses, including Fed Ex, were affected.

Computers across the world were locked up Friday and users' files held for ransom when dozens of countries were hit in a cyber-extortion attack that targeted hospitals, companies and government agencies. Cybersecurity experts say the unknown hackers who launched the "ransomware" attacks used a hole in Microsoft software that was discovered by the National Security Agency and exposed when NSA documents were leaked online.

Neither the FBI or NSA would comment Monday.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/business/technology/article/The-Latest-Japan-Inc-sees-no-major-impact-from-11145835.php